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Ekmanian: Global Resistance Continues 101 Years after Genocide

Ekmanian’s Opening Remarks at Genocide Commemoration Program in Berlin. For the second year in a row, the Maxim Gorki Theater in Berlin organized a program of events dedicated to the anniversary of the Armenian Genocide anniversary. Continue reading

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Houses without Doors: A Journey of a Hundred Years

What is the difference between a feature film and a documentary? A feature has a cast of actors playing roles in a scripted story; a documentary has a sketchy story line and presents research about issues in the lives of real people. One might say that Avo Kaprealian’s film “Houses without Doors” is a bit of both. His earlier short films also belong to the same pattern of not fitting into a classic genre, while also pulling archival footage into his work. Continue reading

Arab Media Hesitant on the Armenian Genocide Centennial

During the First World War, when the Arabs from Hijaz to the Levant were revolting against the Ottomans aspiring for independence, Arab journalists were among the first of those who reported on a daily basis the mass atrocities being committed against the Armenians by the Ottoman Empire. After 100 years, hesitation and mixed reactions dominate the Arab media regarding the issues related to the Armenian Genocide. Continue reading

The Berlin Connection

Gorki Theater’s Monumental Role BERLIN—In commemorating the Centennial of the Armenian Genocide, the road between Yerevan and Istanbul passes through Berlin. Every Armenian knows Komitas Vartabed, the great musicologist and composer who founded modern classical Armenian music, and whose works play a prominent role in our culture. However, few perhaps know about the influence Germany had … Continue reading

And the Struggle for Justice Continues

The following is a speech delivered by Armenia-based journalist Harout Ekmanian in Berlin, as part of a program titled “It Snows in April,” which was launched by the Maxim Gorki Theater. The program is dedicated to the Centennial of the Armenian Genocide. Two years ago, when I visited Berlin for a single day trip for the … Continue reading

Not Another ‘Je Suis’ Article

The attack on the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo last month prompted millions of French citizens and people from around the world to celebrate the slain journalists as martyrs of freedom of speech. We have seen similar waves of reactions in Turkey, Armenia, and the Armenian Diaspora every January since 2007, when editor/journalist Hrant Dink … Continue reading

Ekmanian: Armenia’s Uncommon Sense

After the stillborn Turkish-Armenian protocols in 2009, the (non)relations between both countries hit rock bottom in an unprecedented way, creating an atmosphere of deep mistrust, especially among official circles in Armenia. The latest manifestation of this was President Serge Sarkisian’s strongly worded “To hell with your ratification” statement at the UN General Assembly in September … Continue reading

‘Art Is Worth Dying for’: Director Fatih Akin, Cast, and Crew Speak on ‘The Cut’

VENICE, Italy (A.W.)—Award-winning director Fatih Akin’s historical epic “The Cut” premiered on Sun., Aug. 31 at the 71st Venice International Film Festival as part of the feature films competition program. Akin, along with the cast and producers, were present at the screening on Sunday afternoon at the Palazzo del Cinema in Lido, Venice, which was … Continue reading

Response to Sassounian: Assad’s ‘Recognition’ of the Armenian Genocide

Harut Sassounian’s latest column, titled “Syrian President Finally Recognizes Armenian Genocide,” sheds light on the record of the Syrian government regarding the Armenian Genocide. The article however, ends with an unexpected conclusion, raising serious concerns.

Syrian Armenians in Armenia: Challenges, Support, and Relief

The Syrian crisis began in the spring of 2011, but it wasn’t until violence hit Aleppo in late July 2012 that the first wave of Syrian Armenians began trickling into Armenia. Within just a couple of months, 3,000 refugees were living in the country. While their numbers have continued to increase—just past 11,000, according to … Continue reading